A Travellerspoint blog

April 2019

Palace of Holyroodhouse

Edinburgh, Scotland

Our second day in Edinburgh, we took a short walk to Palace of Holyroodhouse, which sits across from the Scottish Parliament and next to Holyrood Park.

The Palace of Holyroodhouse, also known as Holyrood Palace, is the official residence of the British Monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, in Scotland. It is located along the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, at the opposite end to Edinburgh Castle. It has served monarchs since the 16th century. The Queen spends one week here at the beginning of the summer to carry out her engagements. Unfortunately, we were not allowed to take photos inside of the palace, but I was able to get some pictures of the entrance, the gardens and Abbey. The Palace is probably most known for the murder of David Rizzio, Mary, Queen of Scots', secretary in 1566. The murder was organized by Henry, Lord Darnley, the Queen's second husband. He was extremely jealous of Rizzio's influence over Mary. Mary was at the time pregnant with Lord Darnley and her only child, the future James VI and I. There is a blood stained spot in the Queen's Outer Chamber that is marked as the spot where Rizzio was murdered. It was quite creepy to still see the spot there, honestly. After her secretary's murder, Mary fled Holyroodhouse for Edinburgh Castle.

The tour was fantastic, I just wished we could have taken pictures. It definitely felt more cozy than other palaces and had a more masculine decor, but still tasteful in my opinion. During the tour we were able to see: the Forecourt, the Quadrangle, the Great Stair, the Royal dining room (this room had a beautiful pastel green color theme), the Throne Room (two upholstered throne chairs for King George V and Queen Mary were in here), the Evening Drawing Room (this room had fantastic tapestries on the walls), the Morning Drawing Room, because you can't draw into the evening drawing room in the morning, (this room had a beautiful mahogany settee covered with silk and wool embroidery, and I believe this room is where the Queen gives private audiences to dignitaries), the King's Bedchamber, the King's Closet, the Great Gallery (there were dozens of wonderful paintings lining the walls of this room), the Queen's Lobby, the Queen's Ante-Chamber, the Queen's Bedchamber, and the Mary, Queen of Scots' Chambers (which are located in James V's tower). Mary's Bedchamber had a view of the forecourt. The Outer Chamber had a nice display of relics including the Darnley Jewel and some of Mary's embroidery work from when she was exiled by Elizabeth I.

Palace of Holyroodhouse: https://www.rct.uk/visit/palace-of-holyroodhouse

Forecourt of Palace of Holyroodhouse
e3f708a0-6436-11e9-9ab5-af1f511f2068.jpge3aedc10-6436-11e9-9ab5-af1f511f2068.jpgEntryway.jpge34bfb90-6436-11e9-9ab5-af1f511f2068.jpg

Gardens to the left of the entrance
e83b1af0-6436-11e9-b95b-f7f91494115e.jpg

View of the Holyrood Park to the right of the entrance
e3e2e460-6436-11e9-8b1c-a3837a8338e6.jpg

The Quadrangle
e4d75680-6436-11e9-9ab5-af1f511f2068.jpg

Remains of Holyrood Abbey. Holyrood Abbey is a ruined abbey of the Canons Regular in Edinburgh, Scotland. The abbey was founded in 1128 by King David I.
e1f14d90-6436-11e9-b0a9-6d2e4e8e2c08.jpge2fb4380-6436-11e9-b0a9-6d2e4e8e2c08.jpge304e070-6436-11e9-b95b-f7f91494115e.jpge44094c0-6436-11e9-8b1c-a3837a8338e6.jpg
e2748750-6436-11e9-b0a9-6d2e4e8e2c08.jpge72676a0-6436-11e9-8b1c-a3837a8338e6.jpg

View from Holyrood Abbey into the Gardens
e6395780-6436-11e9-b95b-f7f91494115e.jpg

Gardens
e73543b0-6436-11e9-b95b-f7f91494115e.jpge6b2a630-6436-11e9-8b1c-a3837a8338e6.jpge7a5b8c0-6436-11e9-b95b-f7f91494115e.jpge7c108f0-6436-11e9-8b1c-a3837a8338e6.jpge5678890-6436-11e9-8b1c-a3837a8338e6.jpge7d9c110-6436-11e9-9ab5-af1f511f2068.jpge88ee040-6436-11e9-9ab5-af1f511f2068.jpgedf15ae0-6436-11e9-bf5e-f301d53ba522.jpge588f340-6436-11e9-b95b-f7f91494115e.jpge34740a0-6436-11e9-b95b-f7f91494115e.jpge8a1cc00-6436-11e9-b0a9-6d2e4e8e2c08.jpge94007d0-6436-11e9-bf5e-f301d53ba522.jpge86e11d0-6436-11e9-8b1c-a3837a8338e6.jpge81f2e80-6436-11e9-9ab5-af1f511f2068.jpge555d550-6436-11e9-9ab5-af1f511f2068.jpge4454fb0-6436-11e9-9ab5-af1f511f2068.jpg

Despite not being able to take pictures, I really enjoyed the palace tour and would most definitely return. I would recommend going when they open to avoid crowds. We did go when they opened and there was a line.

Onto Edinburgh Castle...

Posted by LCP 00:41 Archived in Scotland Tagged edinburgh palace of queen abbey mary holyroodhouse lord holyrood scots rizzio darnley Comments (1)

The Royal Yacht Britannia

Edinburgh, Scotland

After arriving in Edinburgh, we dropped our luggage off, grabbed an Uber and headed to the Royal Yacht Britannia. This was an absolute must see for me in Edinburgh since it has a royal connection and I have a new obsession with royal history.

If I am being proper, technically the vessel is called the Royal Yacht Britannia, and was the former royal yacht of Queen Elizabeth II from 1954 until 1997. The Royal Yacht was originally going to be built for King George VI, the Queen's father, but he died a day after plans for the ship were confirmed, so the Queen oversaw the commissioning of the yacht. It was constructed in John Brown & Co shipyards, one of the most famous shipyards in the world, with the keel being laid in 1952. Britannia is moored in the historic Port of Leith in Edinburgh. The yacht has travelled more than a million nautical miles around the globe, including to Chicago, Illinois. Britannia was designed to be able to be converted into a hospital ship if necessary, but this capability was never used. When the yacht was on royal duties, it was escorted by a Royal Navy warship. US Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton were welcomed aboard, respectively. Prince Charles and the late Princess Diana took their honeymoon cruise on Britannia in 1981. In 2011, Zara Phillips (the Queen's granddaughter) and Mike Tindall held their pre-wedding drinks reception onboard the yacht. A retired Rolls-Royce Phantom V state car used by the Queen from the early 1960s until 2002 is parked in the purpose-built garage aboard Britannia. The Queen's former racing yacht Bloodhound is berthed next to the yacht. The decommissioning of the yacht in December 1997 was very emotional for everyone. The tour gave you the feeling that Britannia was a sanctuary for the royals. Britannia is now part of the Royal Yacht Britannia Trust.

The Royal Yacht Britannia Website: https://www.royalyachtbritannia.co.uk

Bell.jpg621a3700-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg

Bow of the yacht
5fd465b0-642a-11e9-bf9b-078724a1758d.jpg

Attempting to get a full view of the yacht
63298420-642a-11e9-890f-81ae706a3d38.jpg

The Britannia is berthed in Leith Port at Ocean Terminal. Ocean Terminal is a mall and the entrance to the yacht started from the mall. It was quite unusual to begin the tour this way. Our tour of the Britannia started in the Bridge.
63231b80-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpgPilothouse.jpg62af2400-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg

In no particular order, we'll start with the Royal apartments:
The Queen's Room
63d68d00-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg64a4b270-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpg

The Duke's Room
619aa6c0-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpg

The Queen's Sitting Room
61e56b60-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpg

The Duke's Sitting Room
61c957e0-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg

The Honeymoon Suite with the only double bed onboard the Britannia.
62416e10-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpg

State dining room
651575a0-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpg

Example of the Queen's place setting
63c46490-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpg

Artifacts from State dining room
5f5d39e0-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg5f6b91c0-642a-11e9-bf9b-078724a1758d.jpg5f539cf0-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpg60613c60-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg

Anteroom. The bookshelf in the corner of the picture was taken from the Victoria & Albert III. The Victoria & Albert III preceded Britannia as the Royal Yacht. Royal Yachts date back to 1660 and King Charles II's Mary, which was a gift from Amsterdam. In all, there have been 83 Royal Yachts.
61e06250-642a-11e9-bf9b-078724a1758d.jpg

State Drawing Room
651f1290-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg

Welmar grand piano form the State Drawing room, which reportedly cost 350 GBP.
633bac90-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg

The Sun Lounge was reportedly the Queen's favorite room onboard the ship.
652aab50-642a-11e9-9b99-5f78b1477818.jpg64dab690-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpg

The royals were separated from the crew, whose quarters were not as glamorous.
615efd50-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpg614d4a10-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg62560780-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg6265bef0-642a-11e9-bf9b-078724a1758d.jpg61a0e850-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg

The yacht's sick bay
6418ed30-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpg62857bf0-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpg6309c720-642a-11e9-9b99-5f78b1477818.jpg

Laundry room
611dae90-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpg642fd090-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg

When the Queen went ashore, she used the royal barge. There were two vehicles onboard in the garage for the Queen to use. The Land Rover and the Rolls-Royce. The vehicles had to be hoisted into a special transporter to be lowered onto the ground. The Rolls-Royce's bumpers had to be removed for the vehicle to be hoisted. Later on, it was realized a suitable vehicle could be found for the Queen in the country she was visiting, so they rarely took the Rolls-Royce onboard and turned the garage into a beer store.
6536b940-642a-11e9-bf9b-078724a1758d.jpg
646c3d50-642a-11e9-890f-81ae706a3d38.jpg65210e60-642a-11e9-890f-81ae706a3d38.jpg

As we walked around, we noticed a few interesting signs.
610e9360-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg5fc6d120-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg62a5ae20-642a-11e9-9b99-5f78b1477818.jpg

The Royal Racing Yacht Bloodhound berthed next to Britannia
61aa5e30-642a-11e9-bf9b-078724a1758d.jpg5f8904d0-642a-11e9-b214-5780b906b511.jpg609fcc00-642a-11e9-a05f-2757c348ec2d.jpg

I really enjoyed the tour of the Britannia. It really felt much more personal than some of the palaces and castles belonging to the royal family. There were two fantastic guides onboard, Tim and Andrew, who were so helpful and nice and entertained several questions from us. I wouldn't mind going back for another visit at some point.

Onto the Palace of Holyroodhouse...

Posted by LCP 08:32 Archived in Scotland Tagged edinburgh ocean yacht terminal royals britannia leith bloodhound Comments (0)

Edinburgh

Scotland

Greetings! Our next adventure took us to Edinburgh, Scotland for a few days. For those of us who are pronunciation-challenged Edinburgh is pronounced E-din-burrah. Edinburgh is the capital of Scotland. We took the train up, which took about four hours in total. One could also drive to Edinburgh via the A1. I'm a fan of the trains, so I will always choose the trains over driving! The train ride was quite scenic. On the ride up we stopped in Durham and Newcastle, which both looked like really cool cities to visit. The train paralleled the shore as we crossed over to Scotland and we had some fantastic views of the North Sea. The topography in Scotland was much different than in England. Scotland definitely had more dramatic landscapes and was much hillier than anything we have seen in England so far.

We had quite a bit packed into the few days we were there, so I will probably break out each major site separately. Our first day, we went to The Royal Yacht Britannia. The second day we went to the Palace of Holyroodhouse. And on the third day we went to Edinburgh Castle. Here I will focus on our exploration of the city of Edinburgh. Edinburgh is the second most populous city in Scotland the seventh overall most populous city in the United Kingdom. Edinburgh has been recognized as the capital of Scotland since the 15th century. The earliest human habitation of Edinburgh has been dated back to 8500 B.C. Enough of the history lesson, let's get on to more exciting things!

After arriving, we had a 20 minute walk from the station to our hotel. We stayed at the The Terrace Hotel in Edinburgh. The hotel is on Royal Terrace and was designed by William Playfair around 1820. Royal Terrace connects with Regent Terrace and Calton Terrace to form the longest continuous building of Georgian architecture in Edinburgh. Our room was quite spacious and we had a beautiful view of the gardens at the hotel. The location of the hotel was great for getting to all of the different sites on our list and near restaurants. It was definitely a quieter part of Edinburgh, which I enjoyed. The breakfast at the hotel was good and the staff were very friendly (it was a family run hotel). From the hotel, it took about 20 minutes to get to most of the sites. The only time we didn't walk was to get to the yacht which was at Ocean Terminal. For that, we used Uber, which was fantastic. We had great experiences with Uber drivers in Edinburgh. We also could not have gotten nicer weather during our trip.

Terrace Hotel: https://www.terracehotel.co.uk/index.php

Hotel cupola
daced670-6415-11e9-b530-bfe882509f58.jpg

View from room
db92c2b0-6415-11e9-8324-9f57a8a211d7.jpgdd44df80-6415-11e9-873d-2d216a82ea3b.jpgdeed1140-6415-11e9-ae63-a5859319a103.jpgda7b8650-6415-11e9-873d-2d216a82ea3b.jpgdd0b8000-6415-11e9-8324-9f57a8a211d7.jpg

View of the North Sea from Leith Docks
dce66bd0-6415-11e9-ae63-a5859319a103.jpg

We were able to get to several famous Edinburgh sites. The first full day we were in Edinburgh we had tickets to Palace of Holyroodhouse (a separate post will follow on that site). On our journey to the palace we walked past the Burns Monument which is a nod to Scotland's national poet, Robert Burns, and the Scottish Parliament building. The Scottish Parliament building is across the street from the entrance to the Palace. After the palace, we walked through Holyrood Park and saw Arthur's Seat, but unfortunately did not make it up to the top. That just means we'll have to go back, ha! Arthur's Seat is the highest point of the park and is part of four hill forts dating back over 2000 years ago.

Robert Burns Monument
Statue.jpg

Scottish Parliament
dbb39120-6415-11e9-ae63-a5859319a103.jpg

Holyrood Park
dad60260-6415-11e9-ae63-a5859319a103.jpg

View from Holyrood Park looking over towards the palace. The Nelson Monument is in the background atop Calton Hill. The monument was erected to commemorate Lord Horatio Nelson and his victory over the Spanish and French fleets in the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. It was constructed between 1807 and 1815.
da1b8c00-6415-11e9-873d-2d216a82ea3b.jpg

Edinburgh city views
dc6750c0-6415-11e9-8324-9f57a8a211d7.jpgdad2f520-6415-11e9-8324-9f57a8a211d7.jpgdd0bce20-6415-11e9-873d-2d216a82ea3b.jpg
dc973a60-6415-11e9-ae63-a5859319a103.jpgd9e62420-6415-11e9-873d-2d216a82ea3b.jpg
d9cf40c0-6415-11e9-ae63-a5859319a103.jpg

Greyfriars Bobby in Old Town. Greyfriars Bobby was a Skye Terrier famous for guarding the grave of his owner for 14 years...talk about loyalty. You are supposed to rub his nose for good luck. He is so famous, Disney made a movie about him. Please excuse the random humans invading the picture.
dd38aa80-6415-11e9-b530-bfe882509f58.jpg

Some things Scotland is known for: whisky (obviously, and in Scotland it's spelled without the "e") and wool and cashmere. You can find some really good deals on wool and cashmere on the Royal Mile, which is the main shopping street in Edinburgh. There were also two excellent whisky shops along the Royal Mile: Robert Graham and Cadenhead's. The staff in both shops were extremely helpful and were very knowledgable and enjoyed educating shoppers about whisky. There were tons of restaurants on the Royal Mile, and we really enjoyed the staff and food at The Royal McGregor. The were very helpful, service was excellent and the food was fantastic. Some other lesser known Scottish things are Scottish marble and the quiach. Scottish marble is a greenish compound formed during the metamorphosis of limestone in the Highlands. It has been revered since the sixth century for its sacred and healing powers and prized by jewelers since the Victorian era. Scottish marble can be found on the facade of Westminster Cathedral in London. Quaich, pronounced "quake" is a two-handled drinking cup or bowl used for guests for welcoming drinks.

Views from the Royal Mile
da9094f0-6415-11e9-ae63-a5859319a103.jpgdd40e7e0-6415-11e9-ae63-a5859319a103.jpg

The Royal McGregor: https://www.royalmcgregor.co.uk

Whisky Shops:
Rober Graham: https://www.robertgraham1874.com
Cadenhead's: https://www.cadenhead.scot

We also managed to make it to the National Museum of Scotland and the Scottish National Galleries. Both places were free, but a small donation was appreciated. The museum was near the Greyfriars Bobby monument was extremely large and reminded me of the London National History Museum. It had a lot of family exhibits, but I most enjoyed the exhibits on Scottish history, which were nicely done. The National Gallery was located near Edinburgh Castle. It was smaller and cozier, but the artwork was fantastic. I especially enjoyed the small room of Nicolas Poussin paintings.

Two other restaurants worth noting were: The Hard Rock Cafe in Edinburgh and The Brass Monkey. Although cliche, the Hard Rock Cafe had excellent service and the food was good. And who doesn't want to collect all of the Hard Rock t-shirts! The Brass Monkey was very eclectic and the best part was they allowed dogs inside of the pub!

Our train ride back was interesting. We had seats next to a very nice Scotsman from Aberdeen, who talked the entire train ride home. He was very nice and I quite enjoyed his Scottish accent, but my introverted self was worn out after four hours of non-stop chatting.

Overall, I really enjoyed Scotland and cannot wait to go back. The people were so friendly and helpful. There is so much to do and see and it is a gorgeous country. I am looking forward to going back to see more castles and do some tours of the Highlands.

Onto the Britannia...

Posted by LCP 10:48 Archived in Scotland Tagged whisky edinburgh castle parliament nelson yacht royal mile wool marble cashmere bobby holyrood burns britannia greyfriars Comments (1)

Burghley House and Gardens

Lincolnshire

Greetings! This weekend's adventure took us to Burghley (pronounced Bur-lee) House in Stamford. This magnificent house is also off of the A1. Burghley claims to be "England's Greatest Elizabethan House" and I certainly understand why. I am just amazed at how this is called a "house," in my non-expert opinion, this fits the "castle" bill.

A little history on Burghley House. The house dates back to the 16th century and was built for Sir William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, who was the Lord High Treasurer to Queen Elizabeth I. Burghley House has been in the Cecil family for over 16 generations. Michael Exeter is the current Cecil family member associated with the property. He is also known as the 8th Marquess of Exeter, 17th Earl of Exeter and 18th Baron Burghley. Fun fact, Michael was born in Canada and educated in England. During his schooling in England, he lived at Burghley with his grandparents (the Fifth Marquess and Marchioness). He now lives in Oregon. His cousin lives at Burghley and is the House Director for the Burghley House Preservation Trust, which oversees the house and gardens and overall estate. The main part of the house has 35 major rooms on the ground and first floors. There are more than 80 lesser rooms and numerous halls, corridors, bathrooms, and service areas throughout. We were able to go into 16 of the rooms. Much to my dismay yet again, Capability Brown left his mark on several parts of the property and not just the gardens.

Burghley House: https://www.burghley.co.uk

Entrance to Burghley House
d9309bf0-5ed4-11e9-b382-b3af48c589f1.jpg

Our entrance to the tour
dc10b170-5ed4-11e9-bb6e-9f9d9268da8c.jpg

Our tour started in the Old Kitchen. The kitchen was massive, which is of no surprise. I took a few pictures of different "appliances" in the kitchen.

Roaster
d2b3d7b0-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpg
Oven
d448f6a0-5ed4-11e9-b382-b3af48c589f1.jpg

After the kitchen, the tour went to the Hog's Hall. Not quite sure why it is called that. There were several fire buckets here and a porter chair. I quite enjoyed the "bell system" which was the intercom system back in the day (this should look somewhat familiar to Downton Abbey fans!). Until 1950, the only telephone in the entire house was located in the Hog's Hall and Burghley was connected to mains electricity in 1956. I would call that an upgrade.
f88c3020-5ed6-11e9-ae30-cd9bfede476f.jpgf7d58a50-5ed6-11e9-b382-b3af48c589f1.jpgf7d3b590-5ed6-11e9-8c02-f91cf6434645.jpg

From Hog's Hall we walked up the Roman Stairs which were beautiful and decorated with Tudor emblems.
9ba93cd0-5ed7-11e9-ae30-cd9bfede476f.jpgd4750fb0-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpg

From the staircase, we reached the Ante Chapel and then the Chapel. The Chapel was beautiful.
0a328260-5ed8-11e9-8c02-f91cf6434645.jpg

The guide in the room mentioned that this is the family bible dating back to the 16th century.
0a37d990-5ed8-11e9-ae30-cd9bfede476f.jpg

From the chapel we walked through the Billard Room, where as one could imagine was a billiards table. The table was made of wood from the HMS Royal George which sank at Spithead in 1782. We then went into the Bow Room.

From the Bow Room
abee2a50-5ed8-11e9-ae30-cd9bfede476f.jpgd2930940-5ed4-11e9-9b2b-55c95f3e3d1a.jpg

After the Bow Room, it was into the Brown Drawing Room. The bed in the room was used by a young Queen Victoria.
d89b2070-5ed9-11e9-8c02-f91cf6434645.jpg

After the Brown Drawing Room, it was into the Black and Yellow Room. Apparently this room has had King George VI, HM Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and the Duke and Duchess of York stay here when they visited Burghley. The guide in the Black and Yellow Room mentioned that a sign of wealth was buying tapestries or having tapestries made. There were dozens of tapestries on the walls of the house, indicative of the wealth of the family.
daaa43a0-5ed4-11e9-b382-b3af48c589f1.jpg

The Marquetry Room was immediately following the Black and Yellow Room. I really liked this room. I found it interesting with its large doorway and corner chimney. There was also a small Jewel Closet hidden away in the side of the room and a beautiful mural painted on the ceiling of the closet.
6e101520-5eda-11e9-89a4-8bd45170bf15.jpg6e418560-5eda-11e9-ae30-cd9bfede476f.jpg

Corner chimney
6e37c160-5eda-11e9-b382-b3af48c589f1.jpg

Jewel Closet
d4c1a910-5ed4-11e9-bb6e-9f9d9268da8c.jpg

Mural on ceiling of Jewel Closet
ae920f40-5eda-11e9-ae30-cd9bfede476f.jpg

From the Marquetry Room, the tour led into Queen Elizabeth's Bedroom. Unfortunately, Queen Elizabeth was prevented from staying at Burghley when she visited in 1566 due to a contagious illness within the household, so she never actually stayed in this room, despite it bearing her name.
d6d63130-5ed4-11e9-bb6e-9f9d9268da8c.jpg

We next went into the Pagoda Room, which reminded me of an office. This room also had two little closets on the sides; one had a tub and the other looked to be a dressing room.
d6815a70-5ed4-11e9-bb6e-9f9d9268da8c.jpg
702718d0-5edb-11e9-8c02-f91cf6434645.jpg70661da0-5edb-11e9-8c02-f91cf6434645.jpg

Next, was the Blue Silk Bedroom, followed by the ever creatively named, Blue Silk Dressing Room. I, again, really enjoyed the corner chimney in the room as well as the paintings.
Blue Silk Bedroom
0bdf9950-5edc-11e9-8c02-f91cf6434645.jpg

Blue Silk Dressing Room
d76774b0-5ed4-11e9-bb6e-9f9d9268da8c.jpg

The tour continued through to the First, Second, Third, and Fourth George Rooms.
Fireplace in the First George Room
d5544c20-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpg

This was the Second George Room. Queen Victoria and Prince Albert stayed in this room during their visit to Burghley in 1844. I enjoyed the little closet with the washroom in the corner. There were also a pair of gloves Queen Victoria had worn during her visit in a case in the room.
d83e25a0-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpg
24239360-5edf-11e9-8dd3-5331cd8f3d37.jpg

Third George Room
da2b4fa0-5ed4-11e9-b382-b3af48c589f1.jpg

Queen Victoria used the Fourth George Room as her Withdrawing Room....because doesn't everyone need a room to withdraw into? I found the table really unique as well as a few pieces of furniture in the corners of the room.
d8cea5d0-5ed4-11e9-bb6e-9f9d9268da8c.jpgda585310-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpgd64c8ed0-5ed4-11e9-bb6e-9f9d9268da8c.jpg

After the Fourth George Room, was probably the most spectacular room in the house, in my opinion. We came to the Heaven Room, aptly named for the murals painted on the walls and ceilings of the room. The murals, which were painted by Verrio, depict Vulcan discovering his wife Venus in a compromising position. Other gods and goddesses are summoned or presumed to be curious as to what is happening. Verrio had painted himself in the corner of the room as one of the onlookers. The room was used as one of the first rooms for guests as they entered the home because it would evoke conversation, according to a wonderful guide in the room. The view from this room was also spectacular.
d9771ad0-5ed4-11e9-b382-b3af48c589f1.jpgd62027a0-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpg

View from Heaven Room
6d3536c0-5ee0-11e9-ba8e-41f18c09af1e.jpg

If there is a Heaven, there must also be a Hell, right? Indeed there was, but it was called Hell Staircase in Burghley and it did not disappoint. Verrio also painted this scene, depicting the mouth of Hell as the gaping mouth of an enormous....cat. A cat of all things.
d9b1d9e0-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpg

Cabinet in Hell Staircase
d6ee9b30-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpg
Cat's mouth
766a47c0-5ee1-11e9-ba8e-41f18c09af1e.jpg

The final room in the house was the Great Hall, which was rather impressive. This was reportedly used as a large dining room.
47e9ada0-5ee1-11e9-ba8e-41f18c09af1e.jpg
5f218450-5ee3-11e9-ba8e-41f18c09af1e.jpg5f241c60-5ee3-11e9-8dd3-5331cd8f3d37.jpg
d9f74750-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpgd953b450-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpg

And last but not least, the gardens.
dc2a2ce0-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpgdb681560-5ed4-11e9-b382-b3af48c589f1.jpgdc3ca370-5ed4-11e9-b382-b3af48c589f1.jpgdba7dd80-5ed4-11e9-b382-b3af48c589f1.jpgd735b650-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpgdc622cd0-5ed4-11e9-bb6e-9f9d9268da8c.jpgdbd3cf80-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpgdbf27b10-5ed4-11e9-b382-b3af48c589f1.jpgd8e00af0-5ed4-11e9-a6f4-fbc768fcd7cc.jpgdc5a64a0-5ed4-11e9-9b2b-55c95f3e3d1a.jpg

In comparing Grimsthorpe Castle and Burghley House, I much preferred the gardens at Grimsthorpe and the wonderful parkland with trails. I enjoyed both the castle and the house as they were very different in appearance and decor.

On to the next adventure!

Posted by LCP 09:13 Archived in England Tagged gardens england park house hidden burghley Comments (1)

Grimsthorpe Castle

Lincolnshire

Greetings! We took a trip a little north on the A1, which by the way, history-lesson-time, predominantly parallels the Great North Road which was the main highway between London and Edinburgh, to visit Grimsthorpe Castle in Lincolnshire. I had come across Grimsthorpe in a brochure I had picked up. The brochure was really inviting so I decided to do a little more research into tickets as there seemed to be some good deals available. We opted for the 2019 Season Tickets because the ticket not only included admission to Grimsthorpe but also, a few special events, and one admission to Burghley House and Easton Walled Gardens. Burghley House is definitely on my list of places to visit.

A little history on Grimsthorpe Castle. It consists of the castle, gardens, and park. Grimsthorpe has been a home for the Willoughby de Eresby family since 1516. The home was granted by Henry VIII to William, Baron Willoughby de Eresby when he married Maria de Salinas, lady-in-waiting to Katherine of Aragon in 1516 (pop quiz: remember in a previous post...Katherine of Aragon was the first wife of Henry VIII who was banished for not producing a male heir and died at Kimbolton Castle following the last 22 months of her life there...this will come up again below). Construction of the castle is said to have begun in the 13th century and the oldest part is King John's Tower, which was built in the 13th century. In 1715, upon elevation to the Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven, Robert Bertie, 16th Baron Willoughby de Eresby, employed Sir John Vanbrugh to design a baroque front to the home to celebrate his new title (because doesn't everyone do that?!). Sir John Vanbrugh also designed Blenheim Palace and Castle Howard, also must sees. The Willoughby de Eres family still fulfills the hereditary office of Lord Great Chamberlain, the Monarch's representative at the Palace of Westminster, one of three families in England who fulfill this role. Some of oak trees in the park at Grimsthorpe Castle were likely to have been recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 (the big land survey) and were possibly still alive in the 20th century. Capability Brown, left his mark at Grimsthorpe as well, much to my dismay yet again, having designed the current park on the property. Grimsthorpe Castle also played a role both in World War I and World War II. The park was used as an emergency landing ground for the Royal Air Force in World War I and part of the central part of the park was used as a bombing range during World War II.

I've included links below to the Grimsthorpe website and Hidden England, which Grimsthorpe (and Rockingham Castle which we had visited previously around Christmastime) is a part of. I had not heard of Hidden England before, but I am sure we will be checking out some of the properties on there as well.

Grimsthorpe website: https://www.grimsthorpe.co.uk
Hidden England: https://www.hiddenengland.org

We really enjoyed Grimsthorpe Castle. We were able to do a 5.6 mile hike around the park and lake and saw some sheep and very curious deer. I included some pictures below from the trail. We arrived right when the property opened and had a wonderful walk with very typical English weather. Afterwards, we took a self-guided tour of the house. Unfortunately, we were not allowed to take photos inside of the property. One of the most interesting things to me was in The South Corridor. The gallery there is lined with a series of thrones that various Kings and Queens used, to include: George IV, Queen Victoria, Prince Albert, and Edward VII, in the old House of Commons. The Corridor also contained the rosewood desk in velvet that Queen Victoria signed her Coronation Oath on in 1838. George IV's throne was MASSIVE; he was apparently a large man with a 54 inch waist, according to the guide (apparently the nursery rhyme "Georgie Porgie" was an ode to George IV's size) . His coronation in 1821 apparently included a men's only 55 course meal; women/wives were banished to balconies to watch, according to the guide. The Gothic Bedroom in the house contained a canopy of state which supposedly hung over the throne of George IV. It was quite spectacular! The Chapel in the castle was also very beautiful. We were curious how the Willoughby family would have acquired these items as they do not receive money for their role mentioned above. The guide mentioned that the "payment," if you will, was the ability to ask for the thrones, desks, etc. Pretty sweet deal, if you ask me. She also mentioned that the house was technically part of a trust which avoids the dreaded inheritance tax. The inheritance tax could bankrupt families combined with the upkeep of the homes which is why a lot of families turn to trusts for their properties. The guide also enlightened us with a few interesting stories about Henry VIII during our visit. The first story was that Henry VIII prohibited visitors from seeing banished Katherine and Maria, being such a good friend (mentioned above) wouldn't listen, so she hopped on her horse and rode all the way from Grimsthorpe Castle to Kimbolton Castle where the guide told us that Katherine died in Maria's arms. What are friends for! Also, when Henry VIII visited Grimsthorpe Castle he took one look and realized he couldn't deal with the stairs due to a leg injury, so he stayed in a tent out back (probably "glamping") we were told. I am so glad we ran into this particular guide, she was wonderful and we had quite the conversation with her. After we finished in the house, we toured the various gardens. We really enjoyed Grimsthorpe and will hopefully return, if not just to take a walk through the park and gardens.

Grimsthorpe Castle:
976d9460-5944-11e9-969b-d358008f560c.jpg98095f30-5944-11e9-a1c1-858d940ab3a7.jpg
The back of the castle:
9770c8b0-5944-11e9-b4e2-25295ed73650.jpg

Gardens:
9bf147c0-5944-11e9-b4e2-25295ed73650.jpg9c948ca0-5944-11e9-8a78-1519d9b78589.jpg9c99bcc0-5944-11e9-a1c1-858d940ab3a7.jpg9be19050-5944-11e9-969b-d358008f560c.jpg9ac523d0-5944-11e9-b4e2-25295ed73650.jpg99daeae0-5944-11e9-969b-d358008f560c.jpg98eb33b0-5944-11e9-8a78-1519d9b78589.jpg981dd190-5944-11e9-8a78-1519d9b78589.jpg98b7a090-5944-11e9-969b-d358008f560c.jpg979c1e70-5944-11e9-8a78-1519d9b78589.jpg99f13200-5944-11e9-b4e2-25295ed73650.jpg9aa87410-5944-11e9-8a78-1519d9b78589.jpg9c47f340-5944-11e9-8a78-1519d9b78589.jpg9c6cb950-5944-11e9-b4e2-25295ed73650.jpg
97ae1fd0-5944-11e9-969b-d358008f560c.jpg96b47d90-5944-11e9-b4e2-25295ed73650.jpg

Trail:
9ad43f00-5944-11e9-8a78-1519d9b78589.jpg9bf84ca0-5944-11e9-8a78-1519d9b78589.jpg9bf89ac0-5944-11e9-a1c1-858d940ab3a7.jpg9c917f60-5944-11e9-aa46-1be078410cd2.jpg9bb1cdc0-5944-11e9-969b-d358008f560c.jpg9ad1a6f0-5944-11e9-a1c1-858d940ab3a7.jpg9a680fb0-5944-11e9-8a78-1519d9b78589.jpg99e9df00-5944-11e9-a1c1-858d940ab3a7.jpg99d0d8c0-5944-11e9-8a78-1519d9b78589.jpg99723e00-5944-11e9-8a78-1519d9b78589.jpg983e78f0-5944-11e9-969b-d358008f560c.jpg96fdbb90-5944-11e9-b4e2-25295ed73650.jpg9ae6dca0-5944-11e9-969b-d358008f560c.jpg

On to the next adventure!

Posted by LCP 08:20 Archived in England Tagged gardens home england walking castle trail hidden grimsthorpe Comments (4)

(Entries 1 - 5 of 5) Page [1]